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Classic Jonny Quest
Jonny Quest Softcover Books and Other Publications
© 1998-2006 Lyle P. Blosser

Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear Weekly magazine Huckleberry Hound Weekly from City Magazines Ltd was the first British comic dedicated to William Hanna and Joseph Barbera cartoon characters. It was tabloid sized, and dedicated its pages to the likes of Mr. Jinks, Pixie and Dixie, Yogi Bear And Boo Boo, The Flintstones, Top Cat, Wally Gator and Atom Ant amongst others. And, for a time, that included Jonny Quest!

Read actual serial pages and more info!



Screen Gems congratulates Hanna-Barbera Productions for creating an exciting new series: Jonny Quest. 7:30 p.m. Fridays ABC Television NetworkHollywood Reporter magazine from October 9, 1964 ran a full page ad that has Jonny and Race Bannon fighting off the evil frogmen from "Mystery of the Lizard Men."


Ad for CBS 1967 season "Saturday's Super Hero Schedule" cartoon line-up.
The ad is a 2-page ad from a 1967 comic book for Saturday morning superheroes; features Superman, Moby Dick, the Herculoids, Shazzan, Jonny Quest, the Mighty Mightor.

Here's a close-up scan of Jonny's ad in the bottom right corner, thanks to Dan Johnson!
The Jonny Quest Files

Cartoon Files Magazine Spotlight on the Jonny Quest Files by James Van Hise.
-- Canoga Park, CA : Psi Fi Movie Press, 1986. 51 p.
-- Includes an episode guide, model sketches, and interviews with Doug Wildey, Mark Young, and Joe Barbera.

I finally was able to examime a copy of "The Jonny Quest Files" publication recently. That's the good news. The bad news is...well...the book's pretty bad. There are no color pictures, it's all in B&W. They did have a few classic series model sketches, but about half of the sketches were for hardware used in the pretend-it-never-happened "2nd season". Nice to see sketches for the diving bell, the VTOL plane and a couple of others, but not much else. The episode descriptions are almost word-for-word the same as in the H-B Jonny Quest Character Reference Guide -- so, if I noted an error in that book, it's in this one, too! Kinda makes you wonder who copied from who -- the H-B book is dated 1995, while this one is 1986, but I guess there could've been an earlier edition of the H-B book (even though nothing indicates that in the H-B book). Quite a few typos, misspelled names (like Dr. Zinn, with 2 n's, Pash instead of Pasha), and other less-than-professional (IMHO) mistakes make for a disappointing outing. (For example, who ever thought of printing an article on top of large line drawings? Not only was the article a letdown, but it was hard to read, too!)

The author, James van Hise, tries to come across as an expert, but even in his introduction, he gets a number of things wrong; things that anyone who has actually watched the episodes would know were wrong. A particularly bad example: "That original opening of Jonny Quest with a montage of action scenes, including a man being chased through the jungle by lizard-drawn chariots..." (p.11). Lizard-drawn chariots?!? UNBELIEVABLE!! There are more errors...I'll leave locating them as an exercise for the student.

I was looking forward to the interview sections, especially the Doug Wildey interview, but there was precious little to like there, either. A few of the same, tired old questions (about the ending credits, about the violence, etc.) The majority of the interview talked about how the networks interfere with cartoon shows, and how they have silly rules about what can and can't be in a cartoon, etc., etc., ETC. They also went quite a bit into "the future of Jonny Quest" (read: plug for new 1986 show). There were a few good tidbits from Wildey, but not nearly enough to satisfy this fan. This is a Jonny Quest book, right? So let's concentrate on Jonny, not the industry, political correctness, or other topics.

Bottom line: If you can find this book at a garage sale for something less than the cover price of $6.95, it may be nice to snap it up. Anything above a couple of dollars, though, and you'd be better off keeping your money, unless you can find a copy autographed by Doug Wildey as seen in this image; the signature alone is worth more than the book.
Amazing Heroes #95 - May 15, 1986 - Jonny Quest Issue

This wonderful issue has a lot of info, including articles about the show and the (then-upcoming) Comico comic book series. It has a nice set of sketches as well; if you can find this book, I think you'll be pleased. And, of course, it's got that great cover painting by Doug Wildey!

(image courtesy Gary Karpinski)

Amazing Heroes #103 - September 15, 1986 - William Messner-Loebs issue
(image courtesy Gary Karpinski)

William Messner-Loebs was the story writer for Comico's _Jonny Quest_ comic books.

Epi-Log #25
Dec 1992 - Saturday AM and Animation issue

Epi-Log is well-known for its numerous reviews of nearly every TV show produced. This issue contains a review of the 1964 Jonny Quest series; with several large images (see below) and a synopsis of every episode. These synopses are done rather well, and are nearly (but not quite) error-free, being much better than the summaries found in The Jonny Quest Files and the Jonny Quest Character Reference Guide, which were, simply, horrible.

The back of the magazine contained a full-page color image based on the CJQ episode "Mystery of the Lizard Men". While not technically a cel, it appears to be constructed like one (in layers on clear plastic over a painted background).
The following links lead to images from the magazine; these are obviously B&W copies of images produced by Wildey or someone else on the production staff, which is why I've also added the links on the Production Art page.

Video Watchdog

The November 2004 issue (#113) of "Video Watchdog" contains an 18-page article reviewing the history of Jonny Quest, each of the 26 1964-65 season episodes, and the recently-released DVD set. Our web site (www.classicjq.com) gets a brief mention! Visit http://www.videowatchdog.com for more info.

Toon - vol 1. no.8 Fall - Doug Wildey tribute Issue
(image courtesy Dan Johnson)


TV Gold magazine's premier issue mentioned Jonny Quest on its cover (select this link to see cover image). It includes an article by James Van Hise...including a synopsis of ONLY the first 12 episodes that are essentially copied verbatim from his book "The Jonny Quest Files". Of interest to trivia fans are the episode titles reported in this article; especially the "preliminary" names used for "Arctic Splashdown" (Splashdown Antarctica) and "Riddle of the Gold" (The Voices). Here are links to scanned images of the 5 pages of the article: page 1, page 2, page 3, page 4, and page 5. (Thanks to Martin Sentmanat for both the images and the info.)

Comics Feature magazine issues #30 and #31, by James Van Hise
Written by the author of the disappointing The Jonny Quest Files, this article appears to be a duplicate of the article that appeared in that book, but without the annoying presentation over graphic images.


Kitbuilder

While Kitbuilder magazine, issue 27 has a nice cover focusing on Jonny Quest, that front cover is essentially the ONLY reference made to Jonny Quest in the entire publication.

(Thanks to Martin Sentmanat for info.)

Model and Toy Collector magazine

Issue 27 mentioned Jonny Quest on its cover; inside is a mention of the resin kits made by The Shape Of Things and some info on the 1964 and 1987 shows. Here are links to scanned images of the article: page 1, page 2, page 3, page 4.

(Thanks to Martin Sentmanat for both the images and the info.)








Jonny Quest and distinctive likenesses © Hanna-Barbera. All other images, image designs and other image work on this site are © ClassicJQ.com, © Hanna-Barbera or as noted. Text content is © ClassicJQ.com, except where noted otherwise, and may not be shared or re-published without the consent of the author. This is strictly a fan-based site, and is in no way affiliated with or approved by Hanna-Barbera or any other organizations, unless specifically indicated otherwise.